A Young Girl’s Journey to become Amish (Part 3)

Kate is a 17-year-old young woman who is planning to become Amish this summer.  She has graciously offered to write some Monday guests posts for my readers for a few weeks. And she’s happy to answer your questions (left as comments), too. 
After the many questions from last post I decided to take time to answer them. You can learn more about my journey this way and I can answer questions in one location. Works for both of us! 🙂 Before I do though I want to thank you. When I read all your comments on Suzanne’s blog, her facebook page and my own email, I just felt so blessed and encouraged. All the wonderful notes of appreciation and plain ol’ encouraging words did wonders for me. God has blessed me beyond belief and I am very grateful for each of you and your prayers, they mean so much.
All right…back to business, haha! If you have any questions after this you can feel free to email me or comment and again, I’ll try to answer.
Q: I was wondering where you would be living, and whether or not you had spoken with the bishop in the church district you will be living in?
A: Yes I have. A few weeks ago I had a meeting with the bishop, his wife, my Amish “parents” and me. We discussed all sorts of things and answered both of our questions. Our bishop is actually bishop over two congregations and in his other church there are people who were ‘English’ and are now Amish.
Q: What made you decide to convert to Old Order Amish and not one of the other orders?
A: When I first began searching and attending I began to develop convictions based on what I read in the Bible and things I’ve seen growing up. I found that these convictions (dress, electricity, buggies etc.) followed most closely with the Old Order Amish in the church district I had previously been attending.
Q: Kate, Will you have to give up the computer, or will you be able to use a battery-operated laptop?
A: No, I will not be using the computer once I am Amish. I have convictions about the use of computers for things other than communication. Right now I use the computer only to email friends I couldn’t otherwise talk to and blogging (which I consider my ministry). The Amish church I am in has a standard against computers and I agree with this. I will happily give it up once I am able to join the church and follow the standards they have. I know to some this may sound hypocritical that I say I don’t want to use it but I do but this is what I feel I am comfortable with and it works for me. I have considered writing to a friend and having her post them on my blog. That way you can know how I’m doing and continue praying for me if you feel led. This will probably happen but I wouldn’t be posting as often.
Q: What’s an Amish church Sunday schedule like?
A: Sunday’s would start early in the morning with everyone doing chores and getting ready for church. Church would last 3 hours (1st hour is singing and the next 2 are preaching). When church is over the non-members would leave and the members stay to have a meeting. After their meeting is finished the church area is transformed into tables and benches and youth girls get food ready. The main meal is served and the youth girls normally do dishes (silverware, cups and bowls from the food). During this time, and after, everyone will visit and children will play games. Normally around 2:30pm or 3:00pm people begin to leave for home. The youth will stay together for the afternoon normally. Come 5:00pm those invited to the singing, and the youth who’re always invited, will leave to return to the church place and they will hold supper and singing. Youth normally visit for a half hour or so after a singing and then return home. Dating couples will spend Sunday afternoon’s together at one another’s home and the boy will take the girl to and from the singing.
Q: What is normally served at an Amish church service for the meal?
A: At least in our district the food served is always the same. Piles of bread are stacked around the tables and every few people will have bowls in front of them. In the bowls will be cheese sauce, pickles, peanut butter and butter. Occasionally we’ll have a special treat like sloppy Joe stuff, lettuce or cheeses. No plates are used but silverware is set out for each person along with a glass of water. Coffee and Hot tea is passed around too, though I normally stick with water 🙂
Q: Can you speak Pennsylvania Dutch yet?
A: I don’t think I can speak it very well yet but I can understand a lot. I still use a translator for church services but pick up a lot on my own. Everyone thinks I’ll pick it up pretty fast once I’m around it all the time. I hope so!
You’re still more than welcome to ask me any questions you may have but I hope I cleared some of the main ones up for you! Blessings and have a wonderful week, can’t wait to read more of your wonderful comments and emails.
(You can learn more about Kate by reading her Journey to Amish blog.)

About Suzanne

Suzanne Woods Fisher writes bestselling, award winning fiction and non-fiction books about the Old Order Amish for Revell Books. Her interest in the Plain People began with her Old Order German Baptist grandfather, raised in Franklin County, Pennsylvania. Suzanne's app, Amish Wisdom, delivers a daily Amish proverb to your phone or iPad. She writes a bi-monthly column for Christian Post and Cooking & Such magazine. She lives with her family in California and raises puppies for Guide Dogs for the Blind. To Suzanne's way of thinking, you can't take life too seriously when a puppy is running through your house with someone's underwear in its mouth.


  1. deesjorgygal says:

    Gosh, this is quite a journey for this 17 year old girl. I have much admiration and will be in prayer for her as she continues on her journey to becoming an Amish woman. A huge commitment that is sure to be immensely satisfying for a lifetime. May He bless you in a mighty way all the days of your life.

  2. Judy B says:

    Very interesting Q&A session. I just think this is so huge for a 17year old girl to commit to. On the other hand I am pleased that she is following through on her convictions and will soon be walking the talk.

    God Bless you in your journey!

  3. emily says:

    hi kate my name is emily and i would like to be amish when i turn 18 so i still have 4 more years to go and i live in georgia and how could i be amish when there are no communitys where i live

  4. Destiny Adams-Watt says:

    Im turning 15 next month and I would love to be old order amish in either Indiana,lancaster,or Ohio