Friday Feature: Conversation with Author Tricia Goyer

Tricia Goyer is one of those writers whom I can’t wait to meet, face-to-face. She is a warm and generous author, a gifted writer, and has more irons in the fire than any one I know! I’ve bought her books for myself and for others, too. Check out Tricia’s website to learn more about this amazing and interesting woman!


When in the process of writing your book did you begin to look for a publisher?
Way tooooo soon! I started working on my novel idea in 1995. I started my novel in February and I started “submitting” it a writer’s conferences in April. I thought I knew enough … I knew so little! I’m thankful that the editors were helping in pointing out what needed to be fixed. That’s one of the good things about writer’s conference—editors who are there to help you.

What struggles have you had on the road to being published?

In 1999, I was twenty-eight years old and had already published over one hundred articles for national publications. I’d also been contracted to work on two book projects for well-known publishers. Still, I felt far from successful. For five years I’d labored full-time on my own book projects with no luck. My agent didn’t understand, “These are excellent proposals,” she said. “I don’t understand why they’re not being snatched up.”

I just have to try harder, write more, I thought. It didn’t help.

Around that time, I started going through the workbook Experiencing God by Henry Blackaby. I learned one phrase that kept going over in my mind. “Look to see what God was doing and join him.” The premise is this: if you’re doing something that doesn’t work, put what you’re doing aside and see what God was doing. I did that. And… I discovered God had different plans!

First, my grandfather was diagnosed with cancer. I invited him into our home. Between doctor’s appointments, hospice visits, taking care of my husband and three children, there was little time to pen prose. My grandfather passed away after only four months, but inside I was changed. It was as if my heart had been rubbed raw with sandpaper. My eyes were opened to pain, and I had a new appreciation for helping those in need.

Lord, what do you want me to write? I prayed.

A few months after my grandfather’s death, my pastor and two women in the church approached me about starting a Crisis Pregnancy Center. (There wasn’t one for hundreds of miles.) I didn’t want to do it, but I told my pastor I’d pray about it.
The next morning I did pray. I told God. “Lord, I can’t help with this center. I’m a writer and my articles are helping people around the country.”

His response was, “Well, what about the people in your own community? What are you going to do to help them?” Ouch.

Obviously this was something God was doing, so I joined him.

Soon, I was using my writing and organizational skills to create community newsletters, and to write radio commercials and grants. In one year, we had a huge center (given to us for free rent), forty volunteers, and we were reaching hundreds of women. We even received a $13,000 grant to teach abstinence education in the schools! At night I often felt drained by the number of young women who needed assistance–who needed hope–yet, I also felt a renewed sense of satisfaction. Obviously God was at work. I was glad I’d joined him.

I was a hard time in my life of giving up my will for God’s will, but I’ll never go back to the way things were again!

Read more of Tricia’s interview posted at
Grit for the Oyster’s blog.

About Suzanne

Suzanne Woods Fisher writes bestselling, award winning fiction and non-fiction books about the Old Order Amish for Revell Books. Her interest in the Plain People began with her Old Order German Baptist grandfather, raised in Franklin County, Pennsylvania. Suzanne's app, Amish Wisdom, delivers a daily Amish proverb to your phone or iPad. She writes a bi-monthly column for Christian Post and Cooking & Such magazine. She lives with her family in California and raises puppies for Guide Dogs for the Blind. To Suzanne's way of thinking, you can't take life too seriously when a puppy is running through your house with someone's underwear in its mouth.